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totalitarian culture in japan where a fascination await anyone who questioned the destiny of japan to all of asia, the remaining democracies in europe lacked the will to stop even the weakest of aggressors. when mussolini successfully crushed ethiopia, and none of the league of nations states oppose them, that's higher -- it was already dead. this of course was long before hitler invaded poland. a world war ii let me only but they say that what saved the world in our view was that the progressive liberal, new deal government of franklin d. roosevelt, most likely out of sheer desperation unleashed a productive power of free market capitalism to bury the acid towers in a tsunami of tanks, planes, and ships. anyone who's read my my books knows the statistics of pink slime just not far from where i teach, a tank was built from scratch in four and a half hours. henry kaiser's shipyard churned out a liberty ship in a record four and a half days. that's faster than most of my students can write one of their semester papers. this undergirded american military strategy of using weapons and technol
was the guest of the scout master of japan and met scouts everywhere from tokyo to everywhere. other aspects emphasized the youth rather though atically. arrived back in copenhagen. two policeman had to carry him to the niewp office. the juvenile drama clie climaxed during the return. in london he attended a gala lunch within the head of the pacific railway and met the founders of the boy scouts. when he was in paris, he saw around the world in 80 days. popular stage version of the novel that had been playing for decades. he watched the copy of the novel being printed for him bound in gold and em bossed with his name on the cover. he then met jewels grandson who escorted him to the grandfather's grave. there surrounded by local boy scouts he read the message in memory of him from the greatest admirer. adult world circumstance leers at the time avoided aviation in order to make some counted of kind -- some kind of point. bicyclest who were not of the powers began to rebrand the bicycle as a peaceful mean way to see the world. for example, circumcycled the world from 1901 to 1904 gathering new
area. >> japan lost -- >> most of these 50 million casualties were civilians in china. so that's the accepted number. >> maochun yu, professor, what do you teach your at the naval academy speak with i teach mostly military history, world war ii, and modern china, east asia overall. we have every strict -- it's fascinating. i've been here 18 years. it's been a blast spent and here's the book, "oss in china: prelude to cold war." this is booktv on c-span2. >> is there a nonfiction author or book you would like to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv at c-span.org. or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. >> live is stephen carter and he is the author, among many other books of this one, his most recent, "the impeachment of abraham lincoln: a novel." professor carter, they are to premise in here that i want to get to that are historically inaccurate. number one, abraham lincoln survived the assassination of him, and abraham lincoln is impeached. where did you come up with this? >> i start by making clear that in spite of the title, i am a lincoln fan. this is not an argu
's population is joining the global economy. what does that mean? when japan industrialized they brought roughly 30 million people out of poverty. when china joined they brought about 300 million people out poverty. that's been a big story. chinese savings in the world financial market were a part what drove the most recent about new welt wealth in the world. as brilliant a man as allen green span was unable to grasp the reality of our historical moment. it was in part due to that failure that somatic errorrers were made that lead to the meltdown in-housing crisis. in inadequate response, policy to what was really a change in financial market due to growth elsewhere in the world. in the next twenty to thirty years, 3 billion people are joining the global economy. it's going to be a transformation ten times what we have seen which was ten times what happened in japan. now if 3 billion people are suddenly given cognitive freedom, suddenly not thinking just moment to moment, day-to-day, in a existence but are creators, are collaborators, are new contributors, human beings are not just consumers. th
of japan and u.s. flag joined in solidarity. banners from every state in the union were hanging reminding each manufacturer that he was part of a union, industry of thousands that he was a vital member. at the center of all was a sea of balloons that was each tied with silk thread to the stem of a champagne glass. later with the toast under way the balloon's served another purpose the feeling would appear to rise up to raise class's in unison to elevate the celebration for their. it was also printed on american silk. like miniature silk scarves that under the glow of the chandeliers. devised by new york's most famous chef who was quite unintelligible. the banks had more familiar english. then there was skinner's speech, cherishing the recollection of the past to emulate their example. with a great deal of reminiscing to take place but they would help to put a flourishing cap on that topic. they're not only benefactors of the past but the future and they are also making history. >> two days later skinners on a train headed up the connecticut shoreline north to massachusetts. he visited thi
's population is joining the global economy. what does that mean? when japan industrialized, they brought nearly roughly 40 million people out of poverty. when china joined the global economy and so for the firm bought about 300 million out of poverty pity that's a big story. chinese savings in the world financial markets are a big part of what drove the most recent economic bubble because even alan greenspan couldn't figure it out. he wasn't looking at the reality of the moment. he called this the conundrum, he went back to it when he wrote his book. as brilliant a man as alan greenspan was, he was unable to grasp the reality of our historical moment. and it was in part to deutsch that failure, the systematic errors to the housing markets. and the policy was a change in the financial markets in growth elsewhere in the world. well in the next 20 to 30 years, 3 million people were joining the global economy. it's going to be a transformation ten times what we have seen from the china exchange which is ten times what would happen in japan. now if 3 billion people are suddenly given cognitive freed
in the entire world. indeed, he was the guest of the scoutmaster of japan and many groups of scouts everywhere from tokyo to warsaw. other aspects of his journey emphasizes use. when he arrived back in copenhagen the two policemen had to hoist and through the crowd and carry him to the newspaper office. the juvenile from a climaxed during subsequent visits to england and france. in london he attended a gala luncheon with the head of the canadian pacific railway and even better he met sir robert powell, founder of the boy scouts. when he was in paris seesaw around the world in 80 days, a very popular stage version of the novel that had been playing for decades. he watched a copy of the novel being printed expressly for him down in gold and embossed with his name on the cover. he then met jules verne's grandson who escorted him to grandfather's grave. they're surrounded by local boy scouts he later wreath with the message in memory of jules verne, from his greatest admirer . avoided aviation in order to make some kind of point about their place in the world. bicyclist who were not from the weste
. their private dining room had been festooned with flags with the u.s. flag and the flag of the empire of japan joined in solidarity at one end. banners from every state in the union were hanging throughout the room as well reminding each manufacturer that he was, indeed, part of a union, an industry of thousands of which he was a vital member. at the center of it all floated a sea of colorful balloons above tables glistening with silver and chris crystal. each balloon had been labeled with an industry trademark advertising thebred of -- breadth of american silk manufacturing. later on with toasts underway, the balloons served yet another purpose. the very ceiling would appear to rise up as the men raised their classes in unison, elevating the occasion still further. in keeping with the celebration, the menus had been printed on american silk in purple, blue and green with white fringe. like miniature silk scarves, they were soft to the touch and elegant to the eye, casting off a rich luster under the glow of the chandeliers. on the front they listed the exquisite bill of fare devised by new yo
of china, japan, south korea, so what is your feeling, what is meant to have been. did you ask the u.s.. the ec, the south china, the sea of japan is in the 50's, 60's and 70's, all of these countries were internally focused. they were developing their own economies, their own national capacities, you know, their own military is. they're coming on line as a significant power in the 1970's, and it was under him that developed into a significant power. what's happened now is all these countries have developed. and because they have developed, they now have the ability to project power around words into the blue territorial soil that they claim. they didn't have this capacity before. so now we are seeing conflicts about islands in the geographical features that are below water and high tide that we never saw before. people say has everyone gone crazy in east asia? no, every once developed, and now they have military's command there's a conflict in -- and they've developed the navy and air force and there is this conflict and -- there's a conflict of for the geographical space. it's a ba
to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is almost half of the manufacturing jobs are with small and medium sized businesses. i decided that i wanted to talk to some of these small and medium sized businesses and figure out what it was that was givenning them a comparative advantage, and one of the arguments i made in the book is our entrepreneurial culture that allo
and great bust in the stock market, now in the housing market. it happened in ya -- japan where they had a bust both in the stock market and the housing market, and they still haven't recovered fully. and we've got europe, and they've got their own excesses. and the real lesson here is not so much inflation at the moment, but how did we ever let these excesses of housing here, housing in spain, housing elsewhere, in ireland, in this japan earlier -- in japan earlier, remember those days when you used to talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo, and a few hundred acres was equal to the value of all the real estate in california. now, that was real -- i don't know if it was true, but each to talk about -- but even to talk about it was a sense of how extremely -- [inaudible] >> do you share the, when you talk to fed officials, do you share -- >> i'm off the record here? >> no, not now. [laughter] no, no, you're fully mic'd. [laughter] when i talk to a fed official up there because happens to be power within the cia, um, they reveal and betray certain kind of frustration w
concluded. wherever he goes in the entire world. and indeed hold was the guest of the scoutmaster in japan and met groups of scouts everywhere who took him to warsaw. other aspects of his journey likewise emphasized his youth rather theatrically. when he arrived back in copenhagen triumphantly to policeman nevertheless had to hoist them into the crowd and carry him into the office. the juvenile drama drama climax has hold return during subsequent visits to england and france. in london he attended a gala luncheon with the head of the canadian pacific railway and even better he met sir robert powell, founders of voice scouts. when he was in warsaw around the world in 80 days of popular stage version of byrnes novel that had been playing for it decades, he watched the copy of the novel being printed expressly for him bound in gold and embossed with his name on the cover. holds then met jules byrnes grandson who escorted him to grandfather's grave. there, surrounded by local boy scouts he later read the message in memory of jules byrnes from his greatest admirer. adult world circles at at the
that enough with an agent and beyond. he was later pleased to welcome to japan three fellow asian cyclers, a trio of young men who did a world tour on bicycles they show india's equality with other nations. the three young men were members of a bombay weightlifting club, said they were in very good shape. when they left home on bicycles again, october 23, returning in march 1928, 5 years later, having covered 44,000 miles and demonstrated the sons of india were as courageous as the children of any other nation in the world. in making a point about mother india, the three men revealed the several kinds of cool decided that cool decides that this is a than in the 1920s. the first was the british empire. not an obvious choice in some sense a paradoxical line, but the bicyclists were anxious to make clear that the british passports and a letter of introduction from the british governor of bombay have been critical to the passage into europe. whatever their private feelings about the barrage, they say the criticism of imperialism for french and china with a claim to encounter racism unparallel
, and they sent me to japan, and i spent my entire active duty time working in a locked psychiatric ward in japan with navy and marine mental parents, all of which were trying to kill me. i go with peacetime, and i saw a lot of combat in that locked see key yat trick ward -- see key yat trick room in japan. it's similar to the spain book in the sense it's a memoir, and i was 20 years old, from 20-22 i was in the navy, and that's what i'm writing now. i'm also thinking hard about a novel that i want to write after this book. one thing i think i would say that may be i've learned useful to me, and, perhaps anyone else who writes like yourself, is that i always tried to keep the pump primed. i remember finishing one book and saying, realm, what do i do now? i didn't like that feeling. i hope i can keep doing this, know what book i want to do next. it makes me happy, and it's taking the pressure off of me on the book i'm doing now because i know what i'm doing next so i don't have to be perfect in this book. it's not like perfection to drive you crazy and make sure that you do lousy writing. you got
to find ways to not be dependent. have a nephew thinking -- teaching english in japan and staying there into the job market is better here. >> this comes back, we have moved off of the question of the economy. among other things when people say can we afford to spend to boost the economy, the costs of not doing that are among others things a lost generation of young people. a terrible job market, people are coming out of school or college or private school into a market that has no use for them. they never get that first job that makes use of your potential, never get started on the latter. we will be paying a price for our inaction in the face of mass unemployment for years because of what we're doing. >> absolutely right. particularly foolish right now, u.s. government can borrow at negative real interest rate. >> the u.s. government sells bonds that are protected against inflation and will not devalue and the interest rate on ten year inflation bonds at minus 0.8%. people hate government taking their money. >> once you recognize that and recognize we have higher return investme
dragon got back to japan, everybody had radiation poisoning. the man had turned black, their eyes were in the same. they were frightening to look at. the ship was immediately turned off to the other side of the harbor and kept away from everybody and ultimately burn that cd. the crew spent a year in the hospital in tokyo where they had experiments were the two bombs that they chopped on japan in 1945 and eventually they all recovered except for the radium in the dining to be on a pc and well because the data flow for failure. this is a huge international incidents in the united states had to pay reparations to the families. thune turned up with radio active burdens for weeks and years afterwards. so this was a serious, serious problem. one that carson was determined to explore and senate springs. he really thought what was happening with pesticides is similar to what was happening but fallout. i should explain for those of you don't remember, we suppose these things up all the time. in total for about 500 aboveground atmospheric tests of nuclear weapons between 1845 and 1963 with just
on that project, the making of a global capitalism and then even as it helps europe and japan revive, the question is, how does is keep reducing? because now you're creating your own competitors. >> at one point in your book to speak but the american empire, actually dramatic appoints. tucker added as imperialism by invitation. you want to talk to the lead of such a mean by that. >> it's actually a phrase that a sweet story and used for 1945. but it is largely not -- it's a matter of saying that the pentagon in the cna have, in fact, not been essential to the role the american state has played in the world as the treasury and the federal reserve have been. and that term empire which was coined for the way in which decapolis class of europe after 1945 facing strongly and much more concerning labour movements , the socialist threat that they posed, and they were concerned about a soviet invasion. turn to the american state to look to the american state to reconstruct a capitalistic. and in that sense it was empire building. when multinational corporations, the conditions by the late 1950's were foun
to christian democratic party in europe to resist communism appeals or in japan or much later on in the 1980s, the efforts made by the u.s. government to fund and support solidarity to undermind the communism regime in poland or when you think of the role playeded by the u.s. government to help smuggle out, and received a wide audience, and thinking of that, i think there are echoes here and lessons to learn for the present day of the ideological struggle we face today, and it's not a struggle against china, although they could be the greatest adversary in the long run, they do not have a transended ideology at the moment, but when you think about ideological struggle today, the obvious is against the forces of jihaddism extremism, and there is are lessons from "witness" on how to wage the day, and what should be known again as political warfare, and since he was invoked by the greatest explainer and student, i wanted to invox cannon from a 1948 memo he wrote on the organization of political warfare to define what i talk about when i say "political warfare." cannon said it's the employment of
doing that. my zen master to reside in japan become all the way from japan to the prison to visit me there at the prison. finally, one day they said, the last time he was getting ready to concede, they said no. now he's a security risk. there's never been any trouble, any problems, nothing had changed whatsoever. just all of a sudden one day they said you can't see them anymore. it's a security risk. the only people they want, religious why succumb into the prison, are the ones that work for the prison. they're usually like really hard-core fundamentalists, the southern christians who tell you, drop your appeal. if you drop your appeals you can go home to be with jesus. don't worry about it. let them execute you. >> hi. it makes me very happy to see you here, and i guess my question is, speak a lot about your wife, and especially when you're in prison and you have that connection. do you feel like you would've made it without her? >> there's no way in hell i would have survived without laurie. she's like i said a while ago there were times when i could not go on, and she was the thin
because it looked like salt. by the time the lucky dragon got back to japan everybody had radiation poisoning. their skin turned black, their eyes were using, they were frightening to look at. the ship was immediately towed off to the other side of the harbor and kept away from everybody and ultimately burned at sea. the crew spent a year in hospital in tokyo where they had some experience dealing with radiation sickness after the two bombs wheat dropped on japan in 1945 and eventually they all recovered except for the radium and a guy named kubiyana who seemed well but ultimately died of liver failure. this was a huge international incident and the united states had to pay reparations to the families. they had to pay damages to the fishing industry because to know throughout -- tuna had radioactive burdens for weeks and years after words. this was a serious problem. and one that rachel carson was determined to explore in "silent spring". she really felt what was happening with pesticides was similar to what was happening with fallout from nuclear testing. unexplained for those of y
. >> normally is different because of oil. >> i think sweden and germany -- >> in japan. i'd be careful about drawing too much for japan. i think that sweden, denmark and germany are really interesting and what they've done with the deal between labor and capital and also frankly across society. the german reaction to the recession was sensitive laypeople of, everybody would effectively take a pay cut of 30%. it takes a lot of social unity to have that. having said that, i think it's going to take more than going to the social democracy of northern europe because you're feeling tensions also in northern european countries and you'd be surprised at the extent to which this whole discourse we are having could have the same discussion in berlin and particularly in berlin but the germans are realizing this in a way they didn't hollow at the middle class. they did the rest of your. they are the china of the e.u. that's one way to do it. the only other thing i might say, which is funny and the reaction i liked in my book, senior european goldman sachs guy who i quoted my book sent me an e-mail sayi
around the world, china is a huge creditor. we owe them over a trillion, we'll japan over a trillion. governments are holding on to this debt. you know, there is a story. i forget where it was run that mentioned from the peak of the housing double until now they said the average american household net worth was down about 40%. it's actually down a lot more than that when you factor in each share of the debt that has been accumulated in their name by the federal government. so americans are basically already broke. that's why we have to just admit that we are insolvent because the american families cannot repay the money that's been borrowed in their name. so we admit that we are insolvent. greece imposed a hair cut at 50% of the bondholders. we tell people that have one-year treasury bills we can't pay you back in a year. you have to extend the maturity beebee ten years. america has to tell people who are collecting social security right now or who are expecting to collect it they aren't going to get as much money as they were promised. we have to cut the pensions of the retired amid
it was actually like as opposed to learning facts about japan. the other thing, if i were in the room with you you would not be the tallest person. >> we have time for one more question. >> that did not want you to stop talking. are they ever going to legalize marijuana? >> reducing its monthly clip should since when . >> that's great. [applause] building of the capital in the '70s, a stanford white integrate architect was working on in the capital with major architects. of this would prove to be the most expensive but building on the continent, a $25 million when finished by teddy roosevelt. stanford white came around 1872 and said i have to spend another night to it in albany. of all of the one horse towns, this is the worst. but that changed when the capital went up then it became a tourist attraction. and has a an impressionistic idea of the city, articles that cover the ethnic history and every geographic neighborhood and more. it sold all over the country with the unusual development. is a phenomenon i don't understand. i discovered what a fantastic town this is. i had left albany and never
in western europe or japan? the reason is diversity of our capital markets. so bain capital go win, turnaround companies come and get good returns to pension funds for customers. public pension funds are the biggest in company pension funds and nonprofits like universities come individuals way back. so is our ability to get these, sufficient capital markets that enable us to get 50% of her time higher growth rates in europe. seelig hit europe. i do want to bore your viewers with them members but american banks lend american companies rate now about $1.4 trillion from europe that number is 6 trillion, even though the european economies as a whole are about the same size as the u.s. which you call bonded debt, or come in a skit involved in commercial paper, bonds and other sources. five chilliness country, only one in europe. that means europe is top-heavy with banks. but that means is if you're a small company and you start to grow, you don't have the capital industry we have. you don't have the diverse sources of capital here. sue eventually give forest to become part of a big comp
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
-in-law and next to him, his wife, rio, bill manbo's mother-in-law. they were both immigrants from japan. trained as a mechanical draftsman, but did a number of different jobs and he came to the united states and ultimately took up farming in the mid-1920s in the work of the california, southeast of downtown los angeles. they had three children. on the right is the youngest child. that is eunice. she was about 16% even this photograph. on the other hand on the left is mary, who then became mary manbo. on the left is the photographer's wife, mary manbo. and then is bill and mary sun, really. also called bill, that he was called billy and the family. he came in 1940s if this is some 10 shots in 1943. is three years old touching his toy airplane. mary went to the frank wiggins school as well. she was studying to become a seamstress. she became a seamstress and it's costing design for theater come any among other jobs. and there was a third child, a boy. by 1941, cne who is not pictured in this photograph the jamaican later was at you see berkeley in the rotc program in 1941 and units as they say was
and characters are truly larger than life. >> just after that, make japan yen and brian rohan worked in hallinan's office and they were the guys who started halo, he had ran out of the dads front hollar, a victorian house. they were providing legal services to other kids that got bested in the neighborhood. >> is true. since hallinan was the godfather for whole new generation to brian and michael and also tony sir who went on to defend among other things the critters commune with their subject it to one police raid after the next. [inaudible] [inaudible] >> that is a good testament to tony. by the way, but as michael giguere is, just about, another great tier of san francisco, a great photographer. some of them are featured in the book. michael has been a longtime photographer for the 49ers going back to the first glory days of joe walsh and montana in c. and then begin again. said thank you, michael. [applause] >> i think we have time for one more. >> i just want to follow up to medical story, michael's companion, the chairman of our board that the haight-ashbury clinic. terence hallinan organi
that and he said brothers? cousins? uncle? no. at that point* they were joined by the prime minister of japan him and president romney were introduced. are you about 55 or 60? and my clothes? and 56 years of age said the prime minister formally. your name sounds french canadian. [laughter] with i don't suppose you are of french canadian origin? >> no i am not. >> congratulations. [laughter] hitting a grand slam home run in 1950 not until 2008 had another jewish pitcher hit another grand slam home run. congratulations the chancellor said. yes. congratulations. think you. [applause] >> we have to microphones by this stage and we have 25 minutes for questions. >> do you write poems that don't rhyme? i don't think i am afraid to use the phrase sissy. [laughter] sometimes people say to me you could prime somebody's name with this word and i say it is not quite right. they say almost but i say rhyme is all i have got. >> have you referred to the sissy aplomb? >> definitely not. i use the word definitely a case to anybody from high-school is in the audience. >> who are the candidates for the next el
-- [inaudible] from tokyo, japan. it's better than going to a george michaels concert. [cheering and applause] anyway. >> wait, nobody goes to george michael concert for the concert. they go for the after concert. [laughter] >> can i get a backstage pass? [laughter] anyway. i am -- [laughter] every time about to say something i keep going it's the reagan library. i say that holding . >> anyway. i am a conservative working actress here -- [inaudible] it is hard to meet nice conservative men like yourself. [laughter] and i was wondering for you could start fluffy dating website. [laughter] it's going a hit. >> i like the fact that you bring up fluffy mcnuter. probably half doesn't know what it is. [applause] fluffy was a mascot that i created red eye, which was his crazy fluffy thing that -- this was what happens one producer said i don't understand this fluffy. so they just took him away from me. much just like my half brother. they are starting this liberal conservative dating sites. >> try a -- handy date. there were a -- [inaudible] [laughter] >> really? [laughter] help me. >> i'll send you
. [laughter] >> up here in the balcony. >> hi, i'm from tokyo, japan. i love you, and it's better than going to a george michael concert. [laughter] [cheers and applause] anyway -- >> wait, wait, wait. nobody goes to the george michael concert for the concert, they go for the after concert. [laughter] >> can i get a backstage pass? [laughter] um, anyway, i -- [laughter] >> every time i'm about to say something, i keep going, it's the reagan library. [laughter] i say that holding a unicorn. [laughter] >> anyway, i am a conservative working actress here in los angeles -- >> [inaudible] >> and surrounded by lefties. >> yes. >> and it is hard to meet nice conservative men like yourself -- [laughter] i was wondering if you could start fluffy -- [inaudible] dating web site. [laughter] >> you know -- >> it's going to be a hit. >> you know, i like the fact that you bring up fluffy mcnutter, because i think probably half -- who doesn't know what fluffy mcnutter is? fluffy mcnutter was a mascot that i created on red eye which is this crazy, fluffy thing that i -- this is what happens with tv, is one p
, japan, korea, chile, the biggest producer of copper in the world will not smelter copper on their home soil. the export every ounce of copper and copper concentrate on ships to try not to let them do it and it's killing china, which by the way, they are exporting all of theirs to africa. and so they are building smelters in africa so they can export their pollution essentially to africa. it's ironic. china we all know is the biggest consumer. they take about 40% of the world's copper building products for the rest of the world. car breaks, they make everything they are also bizarrely enough the forefront of creating the new technology because they know that they are suffocating in their cities from this problem, so you know, it's weird, the kind of massive polluters they're trying to get the technology to solve the problem way more than we are. and then of course the problem on the side of that is the green technology has run heavily on copper and there's the irony. we might get ourselves in green technology to get rid of the effect is a really good idea and probably more important but
trials and hardships before finally going into the first squadron in japan. there he became an gauge to the girl he loved and was on top of the world. when extra troops failed to arrive in afghanistan that summer, the summer of 2009, matthew volunteered on the ground to help out. the absolutely found his niche with those marines. he took leave the first of july and secretly married theresa. july 10 was the last time i saw him. he arrived in afghanistan the end of july and wrote these final words in his journal on august 2. mom, dad, i can never repay you for all you have done for me. you made me into the man i am today. i hope that i have made you proud. that has always been my goal. i love you both so much. tell the girls i love them and couldn't be prouder older brother. i have always tried to be an honorable man and i truly believe in what we are doing here. i am doing this for my family so that they need not fear. my country so that can be a beacon of light for the entire world. the men around me because no one could ask for it better company than the u.s. armed forces and finall
cause my closet probably dying. [laughter] >> i can't finance ducal missile from tokyo, japan. i love you. if better then going to a george michael's concert. [cheers and applause] >> way, nobody goes to the george michael's concert for the concert. they go for the after concert. >> can i get a backstage pass clerics anyway, -- >> every time about to say something i keep going, it's the reagan library. >> anyway, i'm a conservative quirky naturalist ear and i'm surrounded by lefties and it is hard to meet nice conservative man like yourself. i was wondering if you could start a dating website. [laughter] >> it's going to be a hit. >> i love the fact you bring up for the next matter because who doesn't know what that is clerics sloughing matter with a mascot that i created on redeye, which is just crazy in fluffy thing. this is what happens with tv is when producers that i don't understand this, so they took him away from me. they are starting this conservative liberal dating site for this very purpose. >> i tried honey date by sean hannity and their site to guys in california. [laught
,000 people in 2004. and it killed the 2004 people in fukushima, japan. that is very real. well, yes and no. imagine you were a molecule in the atlantic ocean. like a termite, you follow the local rules. you do what your neighbor is that you should do. in a circle anywhere from 3 feet to 163 feet. first you circle up to the surface and then circle back. you don't go anywhere. you just keep making the same circular movement over and over again. you iterate any repeat a simple rule. but there is more. when you circle to the service, you make it to the way. the next time you circle to the surface, you make the peak of yet another way. yes, another wave. away with another distinct identity, wave that will retain that identity or hundreds of thousands or mouse that will do a heck of a lot of traveling. would you travel? no. no thing travels. unlike the termite, you, a water molecule, you are too big to see. look at it from the way this interview. you are nothing, you are no thing. your molecules are never the same for more than 60 seconds. no thing travels a thousand miles from the middle of the
been 10 japan still fully with europe and the lesson here is how we let the excess of the housing and member those days you talk about the property around the imperial palace in tokyo? 200 acres was equal to all real-estate of california. that was very old school to talk about it. >> when you talk to fed officials. >> i am off the record. [laughter] >> host: but not now. you have a microphone. [laughter] but when i do the rio the frustration of the criticism there easing too much to say that is the only course of action in the face of a political class not doing much. >> they get it both directions but if you think you can it you are right they have a lot of criticism last few days from the emerging countries that somehow the measures the federal reserve is undermining the prospects for the developing world. we have a responsibility. but i don't understand. it is pretty wild with the causes and the fact and chairman bernanke said the other day that they aim for a policy that in the long run will help everybody. that is the tricky part. >> the lead bidder not, it sounds nice. you d
and it takes over, writes a book, sensitive general macarthur and japan. he commanded an inch to basically steals. she won't give a pack. people are getting married in front of it. she won't go back to an. >> to remember that painting is painted by a german. >> the rhine is used to pay debt. but that was then thinking about other revolutions at the same time to be so love how do you think about revolution, but anyway, kind of climbing this landscape as that cockpit of revolution. some of two minds about that because first there is the idea that, while minority is looking at a year. i mean, there are plaques all-around. and you can find people who are thinking about it, short. the general understanding, massachusetts based were run by virginians. >> one of virginia and fun massachusetts. saratoga. of course battles and -- off the coast of georgia and panels in canada, and in the -- battle some western europe's, but the majority of battles are fought here. the interesting, the really interesting thing to me is that most of the battles fought here, the big battles are lost, losses the really
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